What does it mean when your Rdw SD is low?

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What does it mean when your Rdw SD is low?

A low RDW means your red blood cells are all about the same size. A high RDW means you have both very small and very large red blood cells. You may also have a normal RDW.

What is the difference between RDW and Rdw SD?

Red blood cell distribution width standard deviation (RDW-SD) particle size distribution. RDW-SD is the arithmetic width of the distribution curve measured at the 20% frequency level. The RDW-CV and RDW-SD are measures of the dispersion of data around the mean. The more spread apart the data, the higher the SD.

Is high MCV serious?

Extremely high MCV (>130 fL) narrows the differential diagnosis, to include ART treatment for HIV infection, use of hydroxyurea, and vitamin B12 or folate deficiency. The MCV values may be falsely elevated when significant reticulocytosis is present, because the reticulocyte volume is high.

Why is my MCV high?

High MCV is seen with macrocytic anemias such as vitamin B12 deficiency anemia. Low MCV is seen with microcytic anemias such as iron deficiency anemia.

What are symptoms of high MCV?

If you have a high MCH value, you may experience the following symptoms:shortness of breath.chest pain.fast heartbeat.fatigue or weakness.very pale or yellowish skin.headache.

What is considered a high MCV level?

High. In pernicious anemia (macrocytic), MCV can range up to 150 femtolitres. An elevated MCV is also associated with alcoholism (as are an elevated GGT and an AST/ALT ratio of 2:1). Vitamin B12 and/or folic acid deficiency has also been associated with macrocytic anemia (high MCV numbers).

What is MCV in lab results?

MCV stands for mean corpuscular volume. There are three main types of corpuscles (blood cells) in your blood–red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. An MCV blood test measures the average size of your red blood cells, also known as erythrocytes.

What causes changes in MCV?

Increased MCV can be associated with thyroid disease, folate deficiency, blood loss, pharmaceutical intake, nonalcoholic liver diseases, and various hematological disorders such as megaloblastic anemia.